August 1, 2014
The Scourge of “Relatability”

newyorker:

image

What are the qualities that make a work “relatable,” and why have these qualities come to be so highly valued? Rebecca Mead writes: http://nyr.kr/1tCReIz

“The concept of identification implies that the reader or viewer is, to some degree at least, actively engaged with the work in question: she is thinking herself into the experience of the characters on the page or screen or stage.

But to demand that a work be ‘relatable’ expresses a different expectation: that the work itself be somehow accommodating to, or reflective of, the experience of the reader or viewer.”

Photograph by Alex Majoli/Magnum.

I relate to this.

(Source: newyorker.com)

July 30, 2014

The furthest possible point from the next performance review!

July 29, 2014

"That’s what you want to eat? Slices of bread and hunks of cheese?"

"Mmf."

July 28, 2014

"It shocks me how few people read The Hot Zone when they were ten years old like I did. I just broke the news of how Ebola works to someone. They aren’t happy.”

"A great cleansing fire of Ebola. Yeah, how was every kid not obsessed with lethal monkey disease?”

"Who am I to not be into cleansing fires? And yeah. Come on, people.”

July 28, 2014
travel-through-mountains:

Us three looking pretty miserable after we realized we forgot to pack food. And bug spray. And sunscreen. And a map. #unpreparedhikers

True story.

travel-through-mountains:

Us three looking pretty miserable after we realized we forgot to pack food. And bug spray. And sunscreen. And a map. #unpreparedhikers

True story.

July 27, 2014
travel-through-mountains:

My brother looking especially tumblr-esque this morning // with thenotes

Me IRL, again.

travel-through-mountains:

My brother looking especially tumblr-esque this morning // with thenotes

Me IRL, again.

July 24, 2014
youngmanhattanite:

youngmanhattanite:

"uh so srsly wat is hppanineg with carljungmanhattanite glog i am hell of confuse"

This is what media types call a “publicity stunned”.

Facebook profile photo: acquired.

youngmanhattanite:

youngmanhattanite:

"uh so srsly wat is hppanineg with carljungmanhattanite glog i am hell of confuse"

This is what media types call a “publicity stunned”.

Facebook profile photo: acquired.

July 23, 2014
Busting out a short story tonight for a reading series called The Disagreement, at Culturefix, on the Lower East Side, 7:00 p.m. Start practicing your excuses.

To be busted is to be broken, ugly, or arrested. To be busted is to be bankrupt or useless, ruined morally or financially. To be busted means that you’re done, finished, kaput; that you’re beyond repair.
To be busted is to be shit out of luck.
Everyone comes to the end of the line sooner or later; the trick is in figuring out whether you can draw a new one, whether or not you you get stuck steps away from the finish or find a new race to run. In this wintery economic climate, money can be the deciding factor, money might buy you all the luck you need. But of course, everyone has their debts to be paid, and money might not be enough. Chance is a slippery thing. You’ll just as likely fall flat on your face.
Hunter Thompson once described luck as “a very thin wire between survival and disaster.” And on July 23, The Disagreement will present Busted, an evening of readings and a film featuring characters trying to manage this delicate tightrope walk.
At Culturefix. We’ll start at 7.
With:
Miles Klee is a reporter for the Daily Dot and author of the novel Ivyland, a finalist in the 2013 Tournament of Books. He contributes to Vanity Fair and Lapham’s Quarterly, while his short fiction has appeared in 3:AM, Unstuck, The White Review, Birkensnake, The Collagist, and Pinball.
Susannah Kemple works at The New Yorker magazine where, in the words of a friend, “It’s not like you actually write stuff. Oh, that came out harsh. Let’s talk about something else. Are you going to finish all your nachos?” Prior to coming to writing, Susannah worked as a German translator and a restorative justice study coordinator , and trained as a puppeteer with an avant-garde company, a job at which she did not excel.
Adam Dalva is a graduate of NYU’s MFA Program, where he was a Veterans Writing Workshop Fellow. He has written a novel, The Zero Date, and was an Associate Fellow at the Atlantic Center for the Arts. His work has been published in The Millions, Bodega, Connu, and elsewhere. Adam is also an 18th century French antiques dealer.
Jesse Wakeman is a New York based actor and artist, who recently completed his MFA at Columbia University. As an actor, Jesse has appeared in numerous shorts and feature films, and is currently collaborating with Kris on the feature version of Donald Cried.  More info can be found at: www.jessewakeman.com.

Kris Avedisian is an award winning filmmaker who lives and works in Rhode Island. He has won awards at Slamdance, The Boston Film Festival, and various festivals. He is currently working with Jesse on the feature version ofDonald Cried, to be shot in winter 2015. www.donaldcried.com

Busting out a short story tonight for a reading series called The Disagreement, at Culturefix, on the Lower East Side, 7:00 p.m. Start practicing your excuses.

To be busted is to be broken, ugly, or arrested. To be busted is to be bankrupt or useless, ruined morally or financially. To be busted means that you’re done, finished, kaput; that you’re beyond repair.

To be busted is to be shit out of luck.

Everyone comes to the end of the line sooner or later; the trick is in figuring out whether you can draw a new one, whether or not you you get stuck steps away from the finish or find a new race to run. In this wintery economic climate, money can be the deciding factor, money might buy you all the luck you need. But of course, everyone has their debts to be paid, and money might not be enough. Chance is a slippery thing. You’ll just as likely fall flat on your face.

Hunter Thompson once described luck as “a very thin wire between survival and disaster.” And on July 23, The Disagreement will present Bustedan evening of readings and a film featuring characters trying to manage this delicate tightrope walk.

At Culturefix. We’ll start at 7.

With:

Miles Klee is a reporter for the Daily Dot and author of the novel Ivyland, a finalist in the 2013 Tournament of Books. He contributes to Vanity Fair and Lapham’s Quarterly, while his short fiction has appeared in 3:AMUnstuckThe White ReviewBirkensnakeThe Collagist, and Pinball.

Susannah Kemple works at The New Yorker magazine where, in the words of a friend, “It’s not like you actually write stuff. Oh, that came out harsh. Let’s talk about something else. Are you going to finish all your nachos?” Prior to coming to writing, Susannah worked as a German translator and a restorative justice study coordinator , and trained as a puppeteer with an avant-garde company, a job at which she did not excel.

Adam Dalva is a graduate of NYU’s MFA Program, where he was a Veterans Writing Workshop Fellow. He has written a novel, The Zero Date, and was an Associate Fellow at the Atlantic Center for the Arts. His work has been published in The Millions, BodegaConnu, and elsewhere. Adam is also an 18th century French antiques dealer.

Jesse Wakeman is a New York based actor and artist, who recently completed his MFA at Columbia University. As an actor, Jesse has appeared in numerous shorts and feature films, and is currently collaborating with Kris on the feature version of Donald Cried.  More info can be found at: www.jessewakeman.com.

Kris Avedisian is an award winning filmmaker who lives and works in Rhode Island. He has won awards at Slamdance, The Boston Film Festival, and various festivals. He is currently working with Jesse on the feature version ofDonald Cried, to be shot in winter 2015. www.donaldcried.com

July 22, 2014

When I started reading David Shapiro, I had no idea who he was. Maybe I still don’t. 
Back then, the anonymity was by design: He was writing a Tumblr called Pitchfork Reviews Reviews, which used Pitchfork’s make-or-break music criticism to slingshot into lengthy disquisitions on the ways in which art invades or influences what we like to call “real life.” It quickly attracted more than 100,000 followers and landed its author in the New York Times.
Shapiro closely guarded his identity at this time, hoping to keep a clerical day job where he composed his essays via BlackBerry. With plans to attend law school, he also feared for his digital footprint. This privacy makes You’re Not Much Use to Anyone, a memoiristic novel that traces the rise and fall of his big-hearted blog, that much more confounding, though it manages to subvert more than one expectation. Welcome to Internet microfame, where status and satisfaction never quite align. 

The Internet becomes a novel in ‘You’re Not Much Use to Anyone’

When I started reading David Shapiro, I had no idea who he was. Maybe I still don’t. 

Back then, the anonymity was by design: He was writing a Tumblr called Pitchfork Reviews Reviews, which used Pitchfork’s make-or-break music criticism to slingshot into lengthy disquisitions on the ways in which art invades or influences what we like to call “real life.” It quickly attracted more than 100,000 followers and landed its author in the New York Times.

Shapiro closely guarded his identity at this time, hoping to keep a clerical day job where he composed his essays via BlackBerry. With plans to attend law school, he also feared for his digital footprint. This privacy makes You’re Not Much Use to Anyonea memoiristic novel that traces the rise and fall of his big-hearted blog, that much more confounding, though it manages to subvert more than one expectation. Welcome to Internet microfame, where status and satisfaction never quite align. 

The Internet becomes a novel in ‘You’re Not Much Use to Anyone’

July 15, 2014

"A Manic Pixie Dream Girl is, like, a woman more interesting than oneself, yeah?”

"Exactly. An interesting woman with terrible taste in men."